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Homes | Buiding Materials | Room Placement | Choosing a Cooling System | Choosing a Heating System | Choosing a Hot Water System | Energy Saving for Windows | Ventilation & Zoning
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Refrigerated Air Conditioners

Refrigerated air conditioners remove heat from the air inside the home and transfer this heat outside.

Keep in mind that buying a bigger room air-conditioning unit won't necessarily make you feel more comfortable during the hot summer months. In fact, a room air conditioner that's too big for the area it is supposed to cool will perform less efficiently and less effectively than a smaller, properly sized unit.

This is because room units work better if they run for relatively long periods of time than if they are continually, switching off and on. Longer run times allow air conditioners to maintain a more constant room temperature.

Features:

  • Highest running costs

  • Highest purchase cost

  • Cool, dehumidify and recirculate room air

  • Reverse cycle models also provide heating

  • Closed system – windows and doors must be shut

Types of Refrigerated Air Conditioners

Portable Units

  • Suitable for small rooms up to 20m2

  • Separate indoor and outdoor unit connected by a flexible hose through an open window or external door

  • Plug into standard power outlet

Window/wall

  • Suitable for single room up to 50m2

  • Requires external window or wall

  • Small units can use existing power outlets

  • Larger fascia units may require additional wiring

  • Outside coil should be shaded if possible

Split System Units

  • Suitable for one or more rooms up to 60m2 – for larger areas, three phase powered units will be required

  • Separate indoor and outdoor section

  • Ideal where no suitable window or external wall exists

  • Very quiet indoor operation

  • The indoor unit can be located up to 15 metres away from the outdoor unit. The indoor unit can be wall or floor mounted

  • Can have multi split systems – up to five indoor units running off one outdoor unit

Ducted Split Systems

  • Suitable for whole home cooling

  • Roof or ground mounted, connected to ductwork

  • Generally less efficient than split or window/wall units due to ducting losses

  • Systems should be zoned to cool living and sleeping areas at different times

  • Ductwork should be well insulated and sealed to prevent condensation

  • Works best if ceiling mounted

  • Suits pitched roof homes

Considerations

  • Rooms in which the air conditioner is being used should be closed off so the room air is recirculated e.g. windows and doors should remain shut

  • If possible locate window/wall units on the south side of the house. If the unit is exposed to dull sun during the day, shade with an awning or canopy of shade trees. However, do not restrict air flow over it.

  • Set thermostats at 26-27 degrees Celsius for summer cooling. Each degree you lower the thermostat may increase running costs by up to 15%

  • Look for economy settings

  • Multi-speed fans allow you to select high speeds for fast circulation and quick cooling

  • Adjustable and rotating louvres also help to direct air movement more evenly around the room

  • Directional louvres set either horizontally or upwards towards the ceiling assist in cooling

  • Programmable timers allow the system to be switched on or off as required


Homes | Buiding Materials | Room Placement | Choosing a Cooling System | Choosing a Heating System | Choosing a Hot Water System | Energy Saving for Windows | Ventilation & Zoning
page 4 of 4