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Homes | Buiding Materials | Room Placement | Choosing a Cooling System | Choosing a Heating System | Choosing a Hot Water System | Energy Saving for Windows | Ventilation & Zoning
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Shading For Other Windows

  • Windows facing north-east or north-west are best shaded by adjustable devices such as awnings or blinds, or combined with horizontal shading such as eaves and pergolas.

  • South facing windows, particularly those facing south-east or south-west, may require shading from the low-angled early morning or late afternoon summer sun. Adjustable vertical shading or trees and bushes are suitable.

Toned Glass, Reflective Glass and Reflective Films

These glass treatments reduce heat gain into your home by reflecting and absorbing more heat than clear glass. Varying levels of effectiveness are available – properly selected toned or reflective glass can reduce summer heat gain (while retaining light transmission) by around 70% compared to ordinary clear glass. They are useful for east and west facing windows but are not recommended for north facing windows, as they will reduce the amount of heat and light entering your home in winter as well as in summer.

Protecting Roof Windows, Clerestory Windows and Skylights

  • These are an effective way to let light in, but careful consideration of the materials used is required to achieve a comfortable temperature in the room below.

  • Roof aspect, positioning and light need to be considered before selecting the appropriate glazing product.

  • All major companies have a comprehensive range of solar control glazing and accessories that maximise light and minimise heat gain. A number of independent companies also offer a range of blinds and shades that can be coupled with such windows.

  • To minimise heat gain in summer, double glazing in skylights needs a further solar coating. Properly selected double glazing with commonly available low-emissivity glass can reduce heat loss from skylights or roof glazing by over 70% compared to ordinary clear glass.

  • In winter, skylights will lose less heat if a diffuser panel is fitted below the skylight.

  • Many skylights are made with permanent venting. This venting should be blocked off for colder weather and opened in warmer weather as the vent allows considerable heat to escape (except where ventilation is required).


Homes | Buiding Materials | Room Placement | Choosing a Cooling System | Choosing a Heating System | Choosing a Hot Water System | Energy Saving for Windows | Ventilation & Zoning
page 3 of 3