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BushFire Safety | Additional Fire Protection | Bushfire Preparation | Home Fire Safety Checklist
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Bushfires-How Do They Affect A Home?


Bushfires affects a home in several ways

Ember Attack usually occurs up to 30 minutes prior to the arrival of fire front and for several hours afterwards.

Burning debris such as sparks and embers are carried by strong winds ahead of the fire front. They can fall on or around the home, igniting small spot fires where they land. If not extinguished quickly, they can grow into a major fire that will eventually destroy the house. 'Fine fuels' such as dry grass and pine needles are most likely to feed such spot fires.

Ember danger spots include: roof cavities, complex roof lines, roof gutters, underfloor spaces, wooden decking and steps, windows and door frames, broken windows, door mats, dried out lawns, vegetation and mulch.

To guard against ember attack:

  • regularly reduce the amount of fine fuel around your property well before and during the bushfire danger period.
  • incorporate design and construction features to exclude the entry of embers into eaves and wall/floor vents
  • patrol the house to check on vulnerable spots and douse spot fires (if able bodied people available)


Direct Flame Contact and Radiant Heat arrives with the fire front and lasts from 10 – 15 minutes.

Radiant heat causes objects on and around your property to rapidly reach the point at which they will ignite. Minimise combustible materials in and around your home, including choice of materials for fences, decks, and roof; choice of vegetation species and mulches; and storage of chemicals, wood and compost piles.

Exposure to radiant heat can cause heat exhaustion and may be fatal to humans.

To guard against Direct Flame Contact and Radiant Heat:

  • Find a suitable shelter with a solid barrier, such as the walls of a well prepared house
  • Cover exposed skin with long tops and pants of natural fibres, solid shoes, hats, goggles and face masks.
  • In areas adjacent to bushland, houses on level ground with a fuel free area 30 metres wide (short, green lawn or a paved area) between it and the bush are less likely to be affected by direct flame contact.
  • Houses located upslope of burning bush, are more likely to come into contact with flames moving through the tree canopy.
  • Be aware that wooden fences or foliage can act as a 'wick' enabling flames to travel towards the house.

    You can find more information on bushfire protection at

    Bushfireinfo.com

    N.S.W Rural Fire Service

    REMEMBER – A LATE DECISION TO GO COULD BE DEADLY!


BushFire Safety | Additional Fire Protection | Bushfire Preparation | Home Fire Safety Checklist
page 1 of 1